Tiger Foam | Spray Foam Insulation | Estimating Coverage (2023)

Coverage Calculator

Estimating spray foam insulation coverage is easy with our calculator. Simply enter your desired final R-Value, height of the ceiling and the length of each wall and the calculator will recommend the number and size of kits you need.

Additional and In-Depth Info for Estimating spray foam insulation coverage:

Below are overviews of the potential applications for each of our product formulas. Please read the entire section for the product you are considering. Gaining a general overview of the strengths, limitations and ideal uses for each type of spray foam insulation will help you choose the correct product and quantity for your application.

Standard to Metric conversion chart for estimating product coverage.
Yield Per Tiger Foam Insulation™ Kit
ProductBoard Feet Cubic Feet Cubic Meters Board Meters

TF200FR

200

16

.47

5.66*

(Video) DIY Spray Foam Insulation - What You Need to know Before You Start

TF200SR

162.5

13

.38

4.58*

TF600FR

600

50

1.4

(Video) Spray Foam Insulation — The Ugly Truth?

16.99*

TF600SR

516

43

1.2

14.56*

*Board Meters = Board Feet x .02832

Tiger Foam™ Slow Rise Formula

When to use and how to calculate coverage for our Slow Rise Formula.

This product is intended for closed wall cavities such as framed houses and structures where the walls are intact with no pre-existing insulation.

Tiger Foam™ Slow Rise (SR) formula is low‐expansion foam. It is designed to expand slowly, filling existing plastered or drywall covered walls completely, without the risk of creating too much pressure and damaging the walls. This product is especially suited to insulating homes that were built without insulation in the outside walls or as a soundproofing for common walls in condominiums, apartments, and to isolate family rooms, bathrooms, laundry rooms from excess noise.

Common uses:

(Video) Is 1 Inch of Spray Foam Insulation Enough?

  • The common wall between apartments and condos for sound control.
  • Soundproofing offices and conference rooms.
  • The common wall between an unheated garage and the main house for thermal insulation. (Also good for soundproofing if it sounds like someone is landing a 747 in your kitchen every time someone pulls the car into the garage!)
  • To insulate outside walls on older homes that lack insulation in the exterior walls.
  • Boat hulls, pontoons and flotation devices. The Slow Rise product is approved as flotation foam by the U.S. Coast Guard.
  • Anywhere injected foam can be used.

Calculating coverage for the Tiger Foam™ Slow Rise Formula:

  • Measure Length x Height of the wall to be filled
  • Subtract the square feet of doors and windows in that wall
  • Subtract 6% for the studs (which you won’t be spraying)
  • Take that total and multiply by 3.5″ for a 2″x 4″ wall, or 5.5″ if it is a 2″x 6″ wall
  • The result is the number of board feet you need to install to complete your project.

Example:

  • 10′ long x 8′ tall wall is 80 square feet
  • It has one door 3′ x 7′ (21 sq. ft.) and 2 windows 2.5′ x 3′ x 2 (15 sq. ft.). for a total of 36 sq. ft.
  • Take the 80 sq. ft. and subtract the 36 sq. ft. and you are left with 44 sq. ft.
  • Take the 44 sq. ft. and subtract 6% (44 x .06 = 2.64) which is rounded to 2.6 sq. ft. and you are left with 41.4 sq. ft.
  • The 2″x 4″ cavity is really 3.5″ deep. You multiply 41.4 x 3.5 = 149.9 board feet to insulate.
  • You would need to order a 200SR kit to insulate this wall

The price of the kits are less expensive the more you buy. A 600 board foot kit is almost the same price as 2 of the 200s, so buying a large 600 kit is 30% free product over buying 2 of the 200 bd. ft. kits.

A simple way to figure how much you will need of the Slow Rise Foam is that the TF600SR kit will cover approximately 148sqft of wall at a 3.5″ stud depth. If the wall is a 4″ depth the kits will cover approximately 129sqft of wall and if a 5.5″ wall approximately 94sqft.

Pontoons:
Your average 16 foot pontoon set requires a 600SR and a 200SR to fill both pontoons. The calculation for filling a cylinder is:

  • π x r2 x L
  • 3.14 = π (pi)
  • r2 (r = radius, which is half the diameter) r2 means the radius is squared (you multiply the radius by itself)
  • L = length of the pontoon

Example:
The pontoon is 18″ in diameter and 16ft long

  • π x r2 x L
  • The radius is 9″ or.75′ .75 x .75 = 0.5625
  • 3.14 x 0.5625 = 1.76625
  • 1.76625 x 16′ = 28.26 x2(for both pontoons) = 56.52 cubic feet in both pontoons.
  • One TF600SR (43 cubic feet) and one TF200FR (13 cubic feet) will do the application

Filling Tanks
Slow Rise foam can be used to fill buried gas and oil tanks, flotation devices, etc. To convert gallons to cubic feet, multiply gallons X 0.1337 i.e. a 400 gallon tank would be 400 x 0.1337 = 53.48 cu. ft. to fill this tank (or very close to it) you would need to use the Slow Rise (SR) formula. A TF600SR will Fill 43 cu. ft. and a TF200SR 13 cubic feet for a total of 56 cu. ft. yield, you would have a bit left over.

55 gallon drums commonly used to make floating platforms requires 7.53 cu. ft. of foam to fill.
A TF600SR kit is 43 cubic feet, and will fill 5.5 ‐ 55 gallon drums
A TF200SR kit is 13 cubic feet, and will fill 1.7 ‐ 55‐gallon drums
For different size drums or tanks: 1 gallon = approximately 0.1337 cubic feet.

Installation of the Slow Rise Foam:
The installation of the Slow Rise foam is done on a timed basis. Speak with our Sales or Technical Teams to help figure out how to approach your specific application.

Tiger Foam™ Fast Rise Formula

When to use and how to calculate coverage for our Fast Rise Formula.

This product is intended for open wall cavities and new construction (before the installation of plaster or drywall) and remodeling projects where existing plaster or drywall has been removed.

(Video) Open Walls - How To Apply Spray Foam Insulation

Figuring how much you need depends on your application. Let’s take a common application where you are either building a new house, or have stripped the drywall or plaster and lathe off the walls in a remodel job. Commonly, you will want to apply 1″ of foam to the interior of the outside walls and add a batt to fill in the rest of the cavity. You can also solely use the foam to achieve the desired R value.

Calculating how much you need:

  • Measure your outside walls length x height to get your raw square feet of wall area
  • Measure the doors and windows and get the total square feet of door and window area
  • Subtract window and door area from the total wall area
  • Subtract 10% from this figure to account for stud space

Example:
A house that measures 40’x 20′ with 8′ walls:

  • 40L + 20W x 2 = 120 x 8′ = 960 total square feet of wall area in the outside walls
  • You have 120 square feet of windows and doors area
  • 960‐120= 840 square feet of wall
  • Subtract 6% (for stud space) of 840, which is rounded to 50 sq. ft. 840‐50=790 square feet of wall area
  • You have a total of 790 square feet of wall area to foam
  • This job would require one TF600FR kit and one TF200FR kit for a 1″ application

Crawl spaces
Crawl spaces and basement ceilings, including rim joists are calculated at simple board footage. For instance, if your crawlspace is 20’x 30′, that equals 600 sq. ft. One TF600FR kit will do that job and you’ll have warm floors and less or no draftiness from air infiltration coming up the walls from the crawlspace or basement.

Metal buildings
Metal buildings are figured on gross sq. footage of wall and ceilings or roof.

Example:
A 20 x 30 metal building with 10 foot walls:

  • 30L + 20W x 2 = 100 x 10′ wall height = 1000 total square feet of wall area
  • You have 145 square feet of window and door area
  • 1000 – 145 = 855 square feet of wall
  • The gable is 2′ above the wall to the peak 2′ x 20 = 40 square feet of gable. This gets added to the wall square feet. 855 + 40 = 895
  • The roof is 11′ x 30′ x 2 = 660 square feet of roof area
  • 895 + 660 = 1555 square feet
  • Add 10% to account for the corrugations in the metal.
  • 1555 x .10 = 155.5 555 + 155.5 = 1710.5 total square feet
  • Three of the TF600FR kits will suffice for the application

Spas and Hot Tubs
Fast Rise Foam should be applied directly to the hot tub and plumbing, usually with a 3″ thick application.’

A note on Tiger Foam™ tank temperature

If it is below 65 degrees outside where you live, you really need to warm Tiger Foam™ tanks to get their full yield. Maximum yield is achieved when tanks are between 75 and 85 degrees. A ceramic heater or electric heater with a fan works well. The closer they are to the ideal temperature, the better the yield. If you don’t keep the tanks warm, you will not get the yield out of the kits and will run out of foam. If you are doing a large project, it would pay to invest in a infrared thermometer for $50 at Sears or Home Depot. If a TF600 gets below 60 degrees, you can lose 30% of the yield, so the thermometer would be a good investment. If the tank temperature gets below 55 degrees F, the foam doesn’t expand and will run.

We recommend that you leave them in the house or a heated space. Many folks don’t realize that if its cold weather and you keep your house temperature at 68 to 70 degrees F, then the tank temperature is only going to be about 61 degrees if you set it on the floor in the house. BEST BET: Put a heat source on these kits before you use them and remember they need to be warm to the touch to get the full yield. In the summer, put them in the sun for a couple of hours then rock the tanks for a couple minutes or so to distribute the propellant and the heat evenly. This foam expands and adheres great within its proscribed temperature ranges. KEY WORDS: TANKS WARM TO THE TOUCH! Pre‐warm the kits 1‐2 days prior to your application to ensure the core temperature of the tanks are within range. They also take time to cool down. You don’t have to keep heat on them while you are spraying. Just get them warm before you start. Unless it’s below 20 degrees outside, they won’t cool down in the time it takes to spray a kit. A little common sense when using these kits really makes them work well.

Never apply a heat source directly to the tanks. Do not subject them to an open flame. Never use a blowtorch to warm the tanks up! (Sorry, that was a real question called into us, so we thought we’d address it before it was asked again).

(Video) Do not use SPRAY FOAM until you watch this! Our SPRAY FOAM ventilation and humidity nightmare!

These kits are a dream to use in the summer, but they do take special attention to tank temperatures in the winter months. We appreciate you taking the time to understand this.

FAQs

Tiger Foam | Spray Foam Insulation | Estimating Coverage? ›

A simple way to figure how much you will need of the Slow Rise Foam is that the TF600SR kit will cover approximately 148sqft of wall at a 3.5″ stud depth. If the wall is a 4″ depth the kits will cover approximately 129sqft of wall and if a 5.5″ wall approximately 94sqft.

How do I calculate how much spray foam insulation I need? ›

To calculate how much foam you require to complete a job, multiply the square feet of area by the thickness of the foam to be sprayed. If the area is 1000 ft2 and you want to spray the foam 2½” thick, then multiply 1000 ft2 x 2½” which equals 2500 bf of foam required to spray the area.

How many square feet will a can of spray foam cover? ›

A typical set of open cell spray foam yields approximately 16,000 bf (board feet) which is equal to spraying 1,600 square feet of area at a thickness of 10" inches.

How many inches of foam insulation do I need? ›

Now generically speaking, we usually recommend open cell spray foam to be 6- to 10-inches on a roof deck or ceiling and 3-inches in the walls. Closed cell spray foam should be 4- to 5- inches on the ceiling and 2- to 3-inches in the walls.

How much does a spray foam kit cover? ›

These kits typically yield 200 board feets' worth of spray foam, making them a good candidate for medium-sized projects, like sealing roof and wall junctions, attic walls and basement sill plates.

How many square feet does a froth pak 620 cover? ›

Dow Froth Pak 620, 2 Spray Sealant Kits, Closed Cell Foam, Covers 1240 sq ft.

Is spray in foam insulation worth it? ›

If you see the benefit of insulating your new construction home correctly from the start for long-term comfort, energy savings month after month, and fewer headaches while you live in the house, then spray foam insulation may very well be worth the extra cost to you.

How much does a 55 gallon drum of spray foam cover? ›

½# Open Cell Spray Foam 55 gallon kits: 16,000-21,000 board feet coverage We also have Open Cell Spray foam insulation for your project. Open cell is great for sound, and you will get your air barrier at 3.5” thickness.

Can I spray foam insulation myself? ›

The answer: no. In fact, the better answer is absolutely not. More often than not, homeowners are looking to replace or augment existing fiberglass or another kind of insulation. Although spray foam is very sticky, it does not adhere well to fiberglass insulation.

How big a gap can expanding foam fill? ›

Low-expansion foam expands up to 30 times its liquid size, while high-expansion foam can expand as much as 300 times its liquid size, quickly putting pressure on a window frame to the point where it's difficult to open and close the window.

Is 1 spray foam enough? ›

Is 1 Inch of Spray Foam Insulation Enough? - YouTube

What is the R-value of 4 inches of closed cell foam? ›

This microscopic difference in the two products creates a dramatic difference in performance. Closed cell spray foam has an R-value of R-7 per inch. In comparison, open cell spray foam has an R-value of R-3.8 per inch. Additionally, the materials have decidedly different densities.

What is the R-value of 2 inches of spray foam insulation? ›

R-Value In 2 Inches Of Spray Foam

The R-value ranges from R-3.5 to R-3.6 per inch. The filling of a 2×4 cavity yields about an R-13.

How much does it cost to spray foam 200 square feet? ›

DIY spray foam insulation kits cost $300 to $500 to cover 200 square feet with 1" thickness. Spray foam kits work well for patching and insulating around doors and windows. Closed-cell foam kits cost more than open-cell kits.

How much spray foam do I need for my attic? ›

Recommended Installed Thickness Chart
ApplicationType of FoamThickness (inches)
Walls (Southern Climates or Sound Proofing)Open Cell, 0.75 lb.3 - 5.5
Ceiling Hybrid InstallationClosed Cell, 1.75 lb.0.5 - 1
Roof (Attic Side Open Cell)Open Cell, 0.75 lb.5 - 6
8 more rows

Can you spray foam insulation in existing walls? ›

Can You Add Spray Foam Insulation to Existing Walls? | Foam University

How many square feet does a froth pak 200 cover? ›

The FROTH-PAK™ 200 kit yields up to 200 board feet of foam. The FROTH-PAK™ 200 kit yields up to 200 board feet of foam (One board foot = 12"x12"x1"), 1.75 foam density. FROTH-PAK™ provides a R-6.1 rating per 1 inch of thickness and R-12.2 when sprayed at 2 inches thick.

How do you figure square footage for insulation? ›

Measure the height and width of any windows or doors in the wall. Multiply the measurements to find the area of each window or door, and subtract them from the total square footage of the wall. This gives you the square footage of insulation you need for that wall.

What is the difference between Froth Pak 200 and 210? ›

Dow Froth Pak Spray Foam Kits - Choosing the Right One. - YouTube

Why do lenders not like spray foam insulation? ›

So why is it a problem for mortgage lenders? By sealing the roof space with this material, air circulation can be restricted to the roof and timbers. This can lead to condensation, which in turn can eventually lead to the rotting of the wooden roof supports.

What is the disadvantage of foam insulation? ›

On the downside, spray foam insulation comes at a price that is considerably more expensive than fiberglass. Often times, spray foam is triple the price of fiberglass and sometimes it can be more. Applying spray foam insulation is also something that is not advised to do by yourself unless it is a very small job.

What are the problems with spray foam insulation? ›

The poor application of spray foam insulation by an untrained or unlicensed contractor can lead to several problems, according to Fine Home Building. Poor application includes off-ratio spraying of the material, bad odors, and a lack of adhesion. A permanent odor can also be created when this happens.

Is spray foam business profitable? ›

Sprayfoam projects are highly profitable and therefore very few jobs are required to achieve total profits of $45,000 - $65,000. In fact, there are large projects being sprayed every day that have profits greater than this on one single job.

What is the area of 600 board feet? ›

A 600 board foot kit will cover 600 square feet at 1 inch thickness or 300 square feet at 2 inches thick.

What is the R value of spray foam insulation? ›

The R-Value for spray foam insulation can vary depending on the product, manufacturer, and other variables. Open cell spray foam insulation is R-3.6 to R-3.9 per inch. This R-Value is normal for open cell spray foam. Closed cell spray foam insulation is R-6 to R-7 per inch.

How long does spray foam insulation last? ›

Typical Insulation Lifespan

The International Association of Certified Home Inspectors states that spray foam insulation, wrap tape and housewrap insulation can last for more than 80 years. At the same time, cellulose, loose-fill, foamboard, loose fill and rock wool insulation can last up to 100 years.

Which is better spray foam or insulation? ›

When it comes to which is best in the spray foam insulation vs. fiberglass debate, spray foam wins, hands down. If you're a DIY-er, you may be used to installing fiberglass insulation. But if you're looking for something that will last a lifetime, let a professional install spray foam.

How do you insulate an old house without tearing down walls? ›

How to Insulate Walls in an Old House
  1. Apply a house wrap/vapor barrier to exterior walls.
  2. Attach 1-inch foam board insulation.
  3. Install siding over the insulation.
  4. Replace old windows with energy-efficient units.
  5. Caulk window trim and use weatherstripping to reduce air leaks.

Is expanding foam a good insulator? ›

Yes, expanding foam can be used as insulation. Expanding foam can be defined as a two-component mixture composed of two materials that react when mixed. This causes the foam to expand and harden, providing an insulating material.

How do you seal a large gap? ›

Measure the size of the gap that needs to be filled. A single bead of caulk can fill gaps up to 1/4 inch. If the gap is slightly larger than this, fill it with a bead of caulk deeper into the gap, but not flush with the surface. Wait until the caulk is completely cured before coming back to put a surface bead on.

Will spray foam stop water leaks? ›

Closed cell spray foam can keep that water out, but that's not a fix because it isn't going to magically disappear or dissipate. Closed cell is water impermeable, which makes it great for a lot of projects, just not this one and here's why.

How thick should my spray foam be? ›

“Normally, what we teach is that all foam applications should be installed in 3/4-inch to 3-inch-thick lifts. If foam is applied thick and quick — say, 4 inches thick — you gain yield. You can cover more wall with less foam. But the foam will be less dense.

Do you need a vapor barrier with spray foam? ›

A vapour barrier is not necessary with closed-cell foam but with open-cell spray foam such as Icynene®, it is sometimes required. Any air that migrates though a building envelope will carry water vapour. As Icynene® spray foam creates a seamless air-seal, it controls air leakage and the moisture in the air.

Does spray foam devalue your house? ›

SPF should never be used in older buildings

In fact, according to Heritage House, they have seen entire roofs rotted and unrecoverable after SPF has been used. They state that by using SPF in your roof, '…you will devalue your home by the amount that a new roof will cost, and more. ' And we agree.

What spray foam has the highest R-value? ›

Spray Foam

The foam (usually polyurethane) is sprayed to fill cracks and gaps in the attic to form a hermetically sealed barrier. Spray foam provides the highest R-value – while open cell spray foam has about an R-value of 2.2 to 3.5 per inch, closed cell spray foam has about 6-7 per inch.

Is spray foam better than fiberglass insulation? ›

Spray foam insulation has a higher R-value than fiberglass, making it a better insulator. Another difference between them is that spray foam is watertight while fiberglass cracks under moisture. However, installing spray foam requires a professional while fiberglass is easy to install yourself.

Does closed cell foam need to be covered? ›

Yes, absolutely. If you put spray foam insulation in a building, it needs a thermal barrier. That's what separates it from the occupied spaces. If there's a fire in the building, a thermal barrier keeps the combustible spray foam from the flames to increase fire resistance.

What is the R-value of spray foam in a 2x4 wall? ›

Open-cell spray foam absorbs and holds water. It has a lower R-value per inch than closed-cell foam and is vapor-permeable. The R-value is R-3.5 to R-3.6 per inch, so filling a 2×4 cavity yields about an R-13.

What R-value is 3 inches of spray foam? ›

The R-value of open cell spray foam is about 3.5 per inch, although the R-value can be different depending on the product. Open cell spray foam has a low density and is many times applied in interior walls and areas that are hard to reach in a home.

Is spray foam insulation cheaper than fiberglass? ›

Cost. Spray foam insulation is considerably more expensive than fiberglass insulation. In some cases, the price of spray foam insulation can exceed that of fiberglass by three times over. As such, fiberglass is often the insulation material of choice for those searching for an inexpensive insulation solution.

How do I calculate how much spray foam insulation I need? ›

To calculate how much foam you require to complete a job, multiply the square feet of area by the thickness of the foam to be sprayed. If the area is 1000 ft2 and you want to spray the foam 2½” thick, then multiply 1000 ft2 x 2½” which equals 2500 bf of foam required to spray the area.

What is the difference between open cell and closed cell foam insulation? ›

Open cell foam is full of cells that aren't completely encapsulated. In other words, the cells are deliberatly left open. This makes the foam a softer, more flexable material. Closed cell foam is made up of cells that are, as the name suggests, completely closed.

What's the difference between open and closed cell spray foam? ›

Open cell foam is softer and more flexible, this means that the core density is lower. Typically, open cell foam has a core density around 0.5 pounds per cubic foot. Conversely, closed cell has a much higher core density due to the makeup of the cell structure.

Can you over-insulate an attic? ›

It's possible to over-insulate an attic as too much will cause moisture buildup and eventually result in mold. Eventually, adding more insulation leads to diminishing returns in trapping heat as well.

How thick should spray foam be in attic? ›

Now generically speaking, we usually recommend open cell spray foam to be 6- to 10-inches on a roof deck or ceiling and 3-inches in the walls. Closed cell spray foam should be 4- to 5- inches on the ceiling and 2- to 3-inches in the walls.

Is spray foaming attic worth it? ›

A properly done spray foam job not only insulates but also greatly reduces the air leakage of a home. But that only works if the installer can get it into the places where most of the air leakage happens. In an attic, the eaves are one of the most critical places to get good coverage with the foam.

Can I spray foam myself? ›

Spray foam acts as a great insulator and vapour barrier, but it's made up of chemicals and needs to be handled with care. While kits are available at hardware and big box stores that allow homeowners to install it themselves, experts recommend people hire professionals to do the work.

How can I insulate my house cheaply? ›

First, cover pipes with insulation. Pipe lagging or pipe insulation is cheap and readily available in DIY stores, making it a simple way to save money. Simply cut it to the desired length and wrap around the pipe, covering the joins in tape.

How much spray foam do I need in my attic? ›

Recommended Installed Thickness Chart
ApplicationType of FoamThickness (inches)
Walls (Southern Climates or Sound Proofing)Open Cell, 0.75 lb.3 - 5.5
Ceiling Hybrid InstallationClosed Cell, 1.75 lb.0.5 - 1
Roof (Attic Side Open Cell)Open Cell, 0.75 lb.5 - 6
8 more rows

How do you figure square footage for insulation? ›

Measure the height and width of any windows or doors in the wall. Multiply the measurements to find the area of each window or door, and subtract them from the total square footage of the wall. This gives you the square footage of insulation you need for that wall.

How do I work out how many insulation boards I need? ›

In order to calculate the amount of insulation batts needed, first you need to calculate the area to be insulated in square meters (m2). Calculating the square metre (m2) area of your walls is actually quite easy, all you need to do is multiply the length x width.

How do you quote spray foam? ›

Add all of the square footage of the area you will spray in the house, multiply that by the spray foam thickness needed (in inches), and you'll have your board footage for the job. (Keep in mind the R-value requirements for the walls might differ from those of the roof.) Easy peasy!

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